What to Consider When Purchasing Contact Lenses

It is always important for people to be considerate about the kind of contact list says they are using and get more information on the company they have bought from to make sure they are creating reliable products. You can always get more information about the solotica natural colors contact lenses so that you are able to know if they are suitable for your eye color and how they will make you look.

The Benefits of Wearing Contact Lenses
The Solitica Natural Color company sell natural colors ‘Ocre’ which are normally on the brownish side while their Solotica Natural Colors Mel are on the greenish side so you should always go for this information while looking for the contact lenses.Solotica contacts is a company that has been around for a long period of time which is why you should make sure you know more about them before making any purchase of their contact lenses.

You should test the contact lenses in various environments to make sure they look as natural as possible and also make sure that other people have giving positive reviews of the product. contact lenses. Checking the reviews of the contact lenses company is really important because they will be able to give you an insight on what is involved and how you can use them for various eye colors.

When buying the Solotica Contacts, you will notice that the actual lenses and the natural color lines thick making it easy for people to wear for a long period of time without any issues. When you are using any type of solotica contact lenses and end up feeling dryness in your eyes it is always important to use rewetting drops so that you are able to take care of the problem and get into your activities.

When looking for the best contact lenses it is always important to check the reviews so that you know what other people are saying the lenses and getting positive compliments is almost the intention of the client. When choosing a company where you will buy contact lenses, it is always important together as much information as you can about where you can find them and the kind of contact lenses they have.

People normally want to get more information about the company they are buying from which is why they prefer shopping online since it is much more convenient for them. when you buy the contact lenses online then you are able to save a lot of money since the company will deliver them to your location.

Publishing your very own book for a low fee or no fee at all seems like an endeavor that is too good to be true. However, I have known fellow authors who have achieved this goal. They have published their very own book that they can be proud of, and they have done it by not putting in a single cent!

Here is the best way that will allow you to publish your very own book for free!

The Best Way: Enter Into Profit-Sharing Schemes with eBook and Print-On-Demand Publishers

The fastest and easiest way to achieve this goal is to publish with online publishers that published eBooks and print-on-demand hard copy books. Some of these publishers will even list your books on their websites, the Amazon sales page, and on other online websites for free. Some of these publishers will even get you an ISBN number and a cover design for free as well.

However, there is a caveat. These publishers usually work on a profit-sharing scheme. For every book sold, you might earn 10% to 40% of royalties. They might also request that the exclusive rights of your books are transferred to the publisher, and they reserve the right to edit, repackage and resell your content without informing you, the original author.

Therefore, do check out the terms and conditions very carefully before signing with them. While this strategy can get you started easily on your journey as a published author, it might not be well-suited if you are aiming for a bestseller, or if you want to publish your greatest work of the century.

Conclusion

After considering the pros and cons of this strategy, you might consider publishing a simple book with these publishers. This will give you the necessary experience to write and publish a book. You can also test your first book to see if it sells.

Since you published your first book for free, any earnings from this book can be used to fund your subsequent book publications. Subsequently, once you have more experience as an author, you can consider other methods of self-publication, while still allowing you to retain the rights to your valued piece of work.

About The Author

Kwan Hong delivers impactful workshops and seminars in public speaking, communication skills, career skills, leadership, personal peak performance, entrepreneurship and business development. He has synthesized knowledge from 8 Degrees and Diplomas, from over 100 certifications and from 1000 books to bring his clients the best tips, tricks and techniques for personal success.

Till date, 120,000 participants from over 100 organizations and events have benefited from his speaking engagements.

One of the most cost-effective ways to promote your book online is through “article marketing.” This tactic involves writing short, informative articles related to your book’s topic and sharing them with people looking for content for their Web sites or e-zines. You make them available for reprinting through online syndication sites such as EzineArticles.com or IdeaMarketers.com.

Articles that get reprinted the most provide helpful or thought-provoking information. How do you decide what to write about? Here are a few suggestions.

1. Review your book’s chapter subheads in your table of contents.

How many of them would make good mini-articles? Most, probably. For example, one of the subheads in the book, “Publicity for Nonprofits,” is “Identifying what’s newsworthy.” That’s a great article topic.

2. Scan your author Q&A in your online press kit for ideas.

What questions stand out as good instructional topics? You won’t want to write an article answering the question, “Why did you write this book?” but your answer to “Your characters have such interesting names. How did you select them?” could easily be expanded into an interesting piece on the significance of character names in novels and how to create them.

3. Make a list of the questions that are asked the most when you’re doing media or blog interviews or when you speak to groups.

Turn those questions and your answers into articles that will showcase your expertise and generate interest in your book.

4. Find the nonfiction nuggets in your fiction and use them as idea springboards.

Did you shadow a police officer while researching your mystery? Write about the essential steps law enforcement officers use to stay safe in dangerous situations and how the rest of us can incorporate them to stay safe, too. Is your protagonist a black belt in karate? Write an article or essay about the advantages of studying martial arts. The possibilities are almost endless if you’re open to seeing how your fictional elements can be helpful in the “real” world.

5. Turn your blog postings (especially those that generated many comments) into articles.

It won’t take much more work, will it? Some of them could be fine as is while others might need to be altered.

For maximum pick-up, keep your articles to 400 to 750 words. If you’re offering “how-to” information, put the steps or tips into a numbered or bulleted list so that they stand out and are easy to read.

All article marketing or syndication sites allow an author credit or “resource” box at the end. That’s where you summarize your relevant credentials, mention your book title, and provide a link to your Web site in two or three sentences.

With your content in place, you can write your headline. Throw out everything you know about writing something eye-catching or attention-getting and focus instead on creating a headline that includes the keywords people will use to find your article. For example, I used “Book Signing Tips” for one of my article headlines instead of “6 surefire ways to sell more books at your book signing” because people are more likely to type “book signing tips” into a search engine to find the information I provide.

Effective book marketing begins long before the book is actually written and the more diligence paid to pre-publishing efforts the better the author’s chance of success. Before hiring a book publicist to garner book publicity for you, get a cup of coffee and get ready for a little online research on book marketing.

A key strategy in any marketing program is to know your competition and successful authors will research competitors before investing time in writing, editing, re-writing, and publishing. How many others have written on the same topic? How have those topics sold? What similar books have done the best? And what made these books successful?

This may sound like a daunting task but it is now as easy as sipping iced tea on a hot, humid day, thanks to a new website called TitleZ – TitleZ allows users to instantly retrieve historic and current Amazon rankings on competitors’ books and create reports with 7-, 30-,90- day and lifetime averages. More importantly, you can use this tool to research your next book or create a marketing plan using the information furnished.

By visiting TitleZ you can compile a list of related books, comparing and contrasting sales figures and rankings. You will want to hurry and check it out now while it’s free in its beta testing stage. After the beta testing period expires the service will be available by paying a monthly subscription fee.

As a book marketing specialist, I have found TitleZ to be very useful in offering book marketing advice to my clients. Authors will find this tool helpful in coming up with book publicity and book publishing strategies.

Visit their web site to learn how a specific book or a group of books has performed over time relative to other books on the market. All you have to do is enter a book title, a subject, author or publisher and TitleZ within seconds comes up with a comprehensive list of books from Amazon plus historical sales ranking data. This information allows authors to see how topics and specific books perform over time and to appreciate what’s hot and what’s not.

Among the advantages TitleZ cites when using its tool are:

· Identify trends with book-buying consumers beyond the top ten lists to see within a given topic which books are gaining in interest and which are declining.

· Quickly and easily uncover best-selling and up-and-coming authors on a specific topic.

· Review renderings of book covers, along with sales ranking data, to see what design features are working in the current marketplace.

· By examining prices of competitors’ books you can make a better informed decision on what to charge for your book.

· Find out how effective promotional appearances, tours, book signings, and marketing activities are in driving sales.

Running your own home book store is fun, profitable and an ideal choice for many people who want to start a low-risk home business. You can start part-time, avoiding the high cost of storefront rent, yet at the same time you can sell used books, textbooks and music CDs and to anyone, anywhere across the country or around the world if you choose.

The actual number of books you need to get started with your own home-based book store varies by how fast you want to get going. You could start with 100 books — you’ll probably sell 10-15% of the books you list within the first month — so if you want to sell more and grow your business quicker, then it will be better to have 1,000 or more used books on hand before you start. Don’t be afraid to start with the books you already own, but stay on the lookout for more quick sellers to expand your business.

FUNDING A HOME-BASED USED BOOKSTORE

Start-up funding will likely be a bootstrap venture in most cases. Two-thirds of all business start-ups like a home book store get funded by credit card cash advances, tapping into savings accounts, or borrowing from a rich uncle in the family. Bank loans and grants to get started are almost unheard of.

One tip to raise cash: Sell something you don’t need any longer — furniture that’s in the way, clothes you don’t wear any longer, maybe hold a garage sale one weekend and clear the clutter around your house — and reinvest the proceeds into building your home book store.

You don’t need much money to get started.

If you’re starting out on a shoestring, I recommend starting with whatever you have. List your books, college textbooks, music CDs or technical hobby manuals on the Amazon Marketplace, and begin learning what sells and what doesn’t.

You won’t make a fortune. But you’ll learn valuable experience in how this business works. You can then parlay that experience and profit into a larger business as you add more used book stock to your inventory.

Getting started selling is easy. Just log onto the Amazon website and get your seller account up and running in a matter of minutes.

STOCK UP ON MERCHANDISE THAT SELLS

Next: Give yourself a goal. For instance, plan on spending two hours every weekend for the next three months, scouring yard sales and thrift stores to locate at least 25 books, while paying no more than 50 cents each. By month four, you will then have found 300 or more good books, and you’ll only have invested about $150, some gas for driving around, and $50 for a couple sturdy bookshelves to hold your new inventory.

Tip: Use your cellphone with Internet access to pull up Amazon used book pricing when you are scouting out books for resale. If the pricing for like books is good — $7 or more – buy the book. You’ll very often be able to list it and sell it for more than $10-$15, and if you buy it for 50 cents or less at a garage sale, you’ll make deliciously good margins this way without getting stuck with stinkers!

But mistakes happen. If you do come home with books that you want to get rid of that you can’t use in your home bookstore, take them to a local used bookstore and ask the owner if they’ll trade for books you can add to your inventory. Sometimes if you’re lucky the owner will buy your unwanted books by offering store credit for books he or she doesn’t want to carry any longer.

Another goal: Show up for work! Get out your calendar. Write in daily goals. Set aside time early each morning or late at night when you get home from your job, log into your account to check orders and e-mail messages, and go to work listing or revising your listings.

My motto is, “You can’t do everything at once, but you can do one thing at once.” Do one thing. Then the next. And the next. By giving yourself certain hours when you need to be working for yourself in your own home-based business, you’ll be amazed how much more you will get accomplished.

WHERE TO START?

Right now, start with the books you already own, and add to them by attending library booksales and fund-raisers, estate sales, thrift stores and even search for them online or through newspaper classified ads. You’ll be surprised to find good used books are all around you.

Post your own free classified ad stating that you buy used books, and list the subjects you are most interested in, but don’t be surprised if the people who contact you have an inflated value of their books’ worth. Be in control. State that you can pay a flat fee for their entire lot of books — example, $25 for a lot of 50 books. Make sure those 50 books contain at least $500 in retail value, because all of them will not sell.

Concentrate buying trade paperbacks in the non-fiction arena. These sell well in almost all condition. If you specialize in certain fields like architecture, history, how-to, UFO’s or the like, keep adding new titles to your stock at all times. Write newspaper and magazine articles related to your expertise. Publish press releases for local media about your new venture.

Post your finds to your Facebook friends or your Twitter followers. One cool feature of posting books in the Amazon Marketplace is that with one simple click of a button, it allows you to automatically post your new listing to Facebook or Twitter, saving you lots of time.

If you do wind up concentrating on buying and selling First Editions, do your homework first. Become an expert in the field. There’s a lot to know and you should know that on Amazon, the typical used book seller is not even permitted to list collectible books, so that avenue is closed to you until you prove some authority or certification.

LEARN THESE BASICS OF BOOKSELLING

To get started in your new venture, here are six simple tips to keep in mind:

1. Learn the book trade and terminology. Study everything you can and add to your knowledge each day.

2. Do make sure you have a sufficient number of titles. The more books you have to sell the better. People want to buy now. They won’t wait around until you find the title. They’ll just move on to the next Internet seller.

3. Be thorough and accurate in your descriptions, revealing any and all flaws in the condition of the book. Don’t be afraid to list your book one step down in condition to stay on the safe side (example: if you have a book in “Very Good” condition, consider listing it in “Good” condition so as to delight the average book buyer, and not disappoint the discriminating book buyer. Better safe than sorry.

4. Do your homework. If you describe a book as a First Edition, be sure that it is one. If you don’t know how to tell for certain, then don’t add this detail.

5. Learn the basics of how publishers insert the bibliographical descriptions in the front section of books. These identify to collectors the year of copyright, the print edition, who the publisher is, the ISBN (10-digit ID number for books that you will use often to search up values and availability of books) and more.

6. Determine where to purchase good, clean used books and how to negotiate for the best pricing.

These are your keys to making maximum profits in your own home book store. With time and effort you can learn how to make money in this simple home business.

To promote a book, an author needs help, and that help comes from people in the media-from book reviewers to journalists, conference planners to bloggers, and many, many others. Approaching these people properly and following their guidelines is essential for winning them over so they will cheerfully help you to promote your book. While good manners and common sense should prevail, all book promoters have their horror stories about difficult authors. Following are the Top Ten most common complaints I have heard from various publicists and book promoters about authors with whom they have worked or refused to work.

1. Making Cold Calls: The telephone is a great means of communication, but it’s also a great interrupter. Before you call someone, visit his website and read all the guidelines. If you can’t get an answer to a question, send an email. People are busy, so when you call them, you interrupt them. Most people will reply to your email in a timely manner, and if a phone call is needed, you can ask in an email when is the best time to call.

2. Being a Bad Guest: Sometimes it’s not all about the author and the book. TV and radio hosts need guests and they like experts. They especially rely on authors of non-fiction books who can inform their audience. In these cases, authors need to remember it’s not about them or their book; it’s about the topic they were invited to discuss. Don’t try to plug your book during the show; just inform the audience. The host will doubtless mention your book when he or she introduces you and again when the program ends. Be a good guest by following protocol and fulfilling the host’s need to give his audience what it wants and you might even be invited back.

3. Being Impatient: Everyone is busy today. Magazines and other publications are often planning out issues six months in advance. Newspaper reporters are struggling to meet today’s deadline. And book reviewers have stacks of books to review. Don’t expect people to respond to you immediately. Don’t expect them to drop everything to read your book or even your press release. Give them a reasonable amount of time. If you contact someone and you don’t hear back from her right away, wait a couple of weeks and then follow up, or ask upfront what is the timeframe for when your book review or the news story might appear. Being impatient will only irritate people, and even if they do run your news story to make you quit bothering them, they might not be willing to do so the next time around.

4. Mailing Out Unsolicited Books and Manuscripts: In submitting books to publishers, usually a query letter is sufficient. Nothing is worse than getting stacks of unsolicited manuscripts in the mail without return postage. The same is true with books for reviewers, especially when accompanied by a letter that says, “Thanks for requesting my book” when the book wasn’t requested. Furthermore, as the author, you’re wasting money. Most unsolicited books end up never being read and instead are donated to a library or Goodwill store, while the manuscripts end up in the circular file, and you’ll be lucky to receive back a formal rejection letter.

5. Posting Your Own Book Reviews: Any author with a grain of sense should know better than to post book reviews at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other online bookstores and give his book five stars. Nothing makes an author look worse. And almost as bad is when Mom, your brother, and Uncle Joe post the reviews for you-you can often tell because Mom will say, “I’m so proud of you, Mary, for writing a book.” The same is true for your website if you have a guestbook to sign-tell your family to stay away from it. Your publicist who wants you to look professional will be pulling out his hair if he has to deal with your mom promoting your book.

6. Printing Non-Credible Blurbs and Testimonials: I know you’ve seen them. The testimonial from A.K. in Hawaii who doesn’t want anyone to know he loves a book but still writes a book review. Who is A.K.? Why do readers care? Find testimonials from authors and experts in your field who are willing to give you their full name. If you don’t know anyone who can give you a testimonial, get busy looking for someone. If you still can’t find anyone, don’t print any testimonials on the back of your book. No blurb is better than a bad or fake blurb. A.K. may be a real person, but for all the reader knows, the author could have made up A.K.

7. Indulging in Self-Praise: Authors who praise themselves and their books only prove to people what big egos they have. This lack of emotional intelligence likely also shows up in a lack of good judgment in writing the book. Don’t make your website read like a commercial for your book. Make it informative, but beginning with “My book is the best one ever written on this topic” and “This wonderful novel was written with touching scenes, engaging characters, etc.” is a turn-off. It’s fine if you have testimonials from others saying those things. Just don’t say them yourself. The same is true with the book’s cover. Tell people what your book is about, but save the praise for your endorsers.

8. Having Insufficient Material: Nothing irritates a book promoter more than trying to promote a book that is not promotable. What makes a book unable to be promoted? No website to visit; no placement in bookstores, either physical or online. No email address to contact the author. Believe it or not, I’ve seen authors who say, “Readers can mail me a check for $19.95 to my address at P.O. Box etc., if they want a copy.” People want a chance to look at the book and read about it before they mail you a check, and they want to pay online because it’s faster and easier than mailing a check. Create an Internet and bookstore profile or your books will rot in your basement.

9. Hiding Your Identity: No one can promote your book if you won’t promote it. Readers care as much about the author these days as they do about the book. You need to be a visible presence in your book’s promotion. No pseudonyms. Your face needs to be on your website and on the book’s cover with a short biography. You need to blog and promote via social media so you appear like a real person online. You need to make appearances at book signings and other events. It’s difficult for a publicist or a radio host to say “This is a great book” and make people interested. It’s easier for them to say, “I’ve read this great book and here is the author who is going to tell you about it.” Your book is your child. Don’t send your child out into the world alone. Hold its hand and go with it.

10. Expecting Something for Nothing: Nothing is going to irritate a book promoter more than an author who acts like he and his book deserve publicity and deserve it for free. It takes a long time to read a book and write a review or a blog. It costs money to operate a website and pay people to maintain it. Even if a service is free, such as a journalist writing a newspaper article about your book, appreciate the value of that person’s time and send a thank you note after the story appears. Always give book promoters a free copy of your book. And do not complain about prices. If you can’t afford the service, find one you can afford, but don’t argue over the fees. Remember that the publishing world is a small place-you don’t want word to get around that you are cheap or a deadbeat.

When a book wins the Pulitzer Prize or National Book Award, or a children’s book wins the Newberry Medal, readers take notice. The book and the author then receive a great deal of media attention. Few other book contests are household words, but if you let people know your book has won a contest, it might still convince them to buy your book. And having an award sticker on your book cover or a statement on your website that your book has won an award can only help you to get media attention and boost your book’s sales.

But authors beware. Everyone is trying to make a buck today, and unfortunately, that has resulted in some unscrupulous people preying upon authors who are desperate to get their books noticed; these people have created phony book contests whose only real purpose is to put dollars in the contest organizer’s pocket. Remember, even if you win a contest, it does you little good if it doesn’t help increase sales and media attention for your book, so be careful what contests you enter. Following are some guidelines for determining whether a book contest is worth entering, just a waste of your money, or perhaps even a scam.

Who is conducting the contest?

Make sure the contest is being run by a reputable individual, company, or organization. The contest should be listed on a reputable website that has a full disclosure webpage listing all the contest rules, guidelines, and other information. Simply an ad in a magazine or on Craigslist does not make a contest legitimate unless it refers people to a full disclosure webpage.

What is the contest’s history?

Contests have to start somewhere so if it’s the contest’s first year, that doesn’t mean it’s not legitimate, but if the contest has a track record of a few years, it’s more likely to be worth entering. Besides a contest history, you should be able to find a list of past contest winners, which is great not only for determining whether your book has anything in common with the past winners so you determine what chance you have of winning, but it lets you determine the quality of the books that have won in the past to see whether it truly is a contest with critical judges, or just one of those contests where everyone wins-yes, those are out there.

What is the fee?

Some people will tell you to avoid contests with fees, but a contest with a reasonable fee is usually as, or more, legitimate. After all, people don’t run contests for their health. It takes a lot of time and effort to organize a contest and to read all those books. Fees usually pay for advertising the contest, for the prizes, and sometimes for small gratuities given to thank the judges for their time. Just make sure that as the contest entrant, you get the most important thing for your fee-someone who actually reads your book. And also that the contest winner actually wins something (see “What is the prize?” below).

Beware of additional fees once you win the contest, such as receiving a discount on book coaching services. You may end up having to pay for extra award stickers-no contest is going to give you unlimited stickers-but beyond that, there should be no extra fees.

Along with fees, also note how many copies of your book are needed. A legitimate contest will usually need more than one book because there are multiple judges who will need to read the book. See also if a statement is made about what happens to the books-do the judges keep them or donate them to a library? Either is fine. You just don’t want to enter a contest where the goal is to collect books that will not be read but sold to earn extra money.

What is the deadline?

It doesn’t matter what time of year the deadline to enter is, but it should be sufficiently far enough away from the date when the winners are announced. If a contest deadline is January 15th and winners are announced on January 30th, it’s likely that not a lot of books were actually read in a two-week period. At least a month should pass between the deadline and the announcements so the judges have time actually to read the books.

Who is doing the judging?

Not everyone is qualified to judge a book contest. You don’t want to enter a contest where the judges are made up solely of the organizer’s family and friends. You want to win a contest where well-known or at least qualified people-writers, publishers, publicists-are doing the judging. The contest should disclose who its judges are. Not “Judges may include” but actually listing the names of the judges, or telling you what group of people compile the judges. A list of famous past judges doesn’t help either if those people aren’t judging the year you enter, although such a list may show that the contest is reputable.

What is the judging process?

Believe it or not, there are contests out there where no one reads the book and everyone gets an award. Those contests are worthless. They might fool you or even some of your readers, but do you really want to win a contest like that where there is no real winner?

Also avoid the “crowd sourcing” types of contests. These contests ask authors to rally everyone they know to come and vote for their book and the book with the most votes wins. A book contest isn’t a democratic procedure, and those votes count for nothing. You could get all 2,000 of your Facebook friends to vote for you, but I bet most of them never read your book so who are they to say whether your book deserves to win over a book by someone with only fifty Facebook friends?

You can tell whether a contest has a reliable judging process simply by looking up some of the books that have won. Don’t be surprised if you find some “award-winning books” have major editing or print quality issues. Stay away from those contests.

A legitimate book contest will have judges and a judging process in place. There should be at least two rounds of judging. In the first round, all the books are read and scored or evaluated. Then in a second round, a list of finalists is named (which may even be announced) before the final winners are determined.

What is the prize?

Believe it or not, winning some book contests can be costly. Look carefully at what the prize will be. Here are some prizes you don’t want: attending an awards dinner you have to pay for, including travel expenses; stickers, trophies, or certificates you have to pay for (you should receive a set number of stickers, and only have to pay for stickers over that number); an electronic certificate you have to print yourself; extra services, such as a press release, that you have to purchase if you win.

Be especially wary of contests that award you “representation.” If the award is that a book will be published by a publisher, or serialized in a magazine, or represented by a literary agency, that sounds great, but read the fine print. Will the agent actually represent you or just look at your book? Will the publisher pay for the printing or expect you to pay partial or full production costs? In short, there should never be a fee associated with the prize.

A prize of some sort should be awarded. It doesn’t have to be anything major like a gold trophy-what good is a gold trophy anyway if it sits in your office where no one can see it? A better prize is one that helps you promote your book, such as a professionally written press release, a book review that is promoted to the media, a set number of award stickers to place on your books, or a special (and free) media package of some sort.

The Pay-Off

Book contests remain a great way to get people to take notice of your book-both the media and your target readers. But make sure you enter contests where you feel you have a good chance of winning and where entering and winning does not hurt your marketing budget, but rather is likely to pay off in publicity and book sales.

Having just graduated from university, cooking books have a firm place on my kitchen shelf. From disastrous attempts at making barely edible dishes, my time as a student has exposed me to many cooking books. Here are the top ten of the best cooking books that are invaluable to any wannabe Masterchefs out there.

Ready… Steady… Cook!

10. Delia’s Complete Cookery Course by Delia Smith

This mammoth cookery book whips in at number 10. Delia Smith is very much the David Beckham of the cooking world – an institution. Her Complete Cookery Course does exactly what it says on the tin. It provides wannabe chefs with a full, comprehensive guide to creating the best dishes. With fundamental must know recipes like apple pie and yorkshire puddings, Delia shows she is one of the masters. With mouth-watering pictures acting as a rough guide this book is a god send for beginner chefs. No doubt a staple on your mother’s shelf, this book is perfect as a starting point in the basics of pastry making, cake baking and roast making. A genuine triumph in the cookery book world.

9. The New Curry Bible by Pat Chapman

Chapman’s bible does not follow the conventional rules of cookery books, but is a diamond in the rough for curry fanatics out there and the reason it has made this best cooking books list. The New Curry Bible does not simply show you the recipes but teaches you the history of curry making. It is not a book to be bought for people who want a quick fix curry. If you are one of those people I suggest you save yourself time and money and just buy a ready meal. However, if you are interested in the exquisite nature of curries, then this book teaches you all you need to know. Like any specialist cook book, it is a little disheartening at first to encounter all of the strange herbs and spices that you know you don’t own, but the rewards from having knowledge of these is irreplaceable. Although it may take you a while to get to grips with the fine art of balancing the spices, you will most certainly become famous amongst friends and family for the talent you will take from this beautiful book.

8. Rick Stein’s Taste of the Sea: 150 Fabulous Recipes for Every Occasion

As a massive lover of seafood, this book has literally been my magna carta. Rick Stein takes you on a journey around the coast and teaches you to really appreciate fish in all its scaly glory. From skinning methods to filleting, this book teaches you how to prepare and cook fish to perfection. Stein writes in a clear and simple fashion and it is impossible to resist his infectious passion. With a variety of dishes that cater for absolutely every occasion, this book is a must have for beginners and experienced fish mongers alike. The instructions are not condescending or set in stone, and leave freedom for experimentation. A truly great book by a truly great chef and teacher.

7. Simple Chinese Cooking by Kylie Kwong

Following the theme of specialist cooking books, Simple Chinese Cooking is an absolute must have for anyone wanting to start a love affair with chinese cooking. Filled with beautiful photography, this book coaches you through each dish with clear and crisp step-by-step instructions. Usually when faced with a specific cook book, there seems a never-ending list of ingredients that appear to exist in outer space, but this book has essentials that can be bought and found easily in local grocery stores. Not only is this book a great guide, but it is also incredibly exciting as each week you can watch yourself develop and gain confidence with once seemingly difficult dishes. From steamed cod to sweet and sour pork, Kwong’s recipes will have you burning all your chinese takeaway menus from the get go.

6. Jamie’s 30 Minute Meals by Jamie Oliver

There can be no such thing as a best cooking books list without Mr Oliver, of course. One of the things I love most about almost all of Jamie Oliver’s cook books are their beautiful and impeccable presentation. They are not endless pages of lines and lines of writing but are instead filled with bright, colourful and delectable pictures, as well as no- nonsense recipes. In his 30 Minute Meals Jaime shows you that once and for all cooking does not have to be a stressful and laborious affair. Jamie’s 30 Minute Meals is amazing for working people for whom time is money, and of course students who wish to spend minimum amount of time cooking and maximum amount of time… studying. Not only is it wonderfully organised with a designated section for starters, mains and desserts, but there are numerous vegetarian recipes scattered inside, making this book literally for every type of chef.

5. The Best Recipes in the World by Mark Bittman

After his debut cook book How to Cook Everything became an international sensation, Bittman is back to teach you it is easier than you thought to cook recipes from all around the world. With no unnecessary embellishments Bittman gently leads you on a culinary round the world trip that will leave your taste buds in a state of euphoria. The best aspect of Mark Bittman’s The Best Recipes In The World whilst you may never get round to cooking everything inside, the dishes you do make will leave you feeling inspired to take dishes you already cook and turn them on their head. Although it can be overwhelming to face so many recipes in one book, I urge you to add this to your collection. It is timeless and will only help to increase your knowledge of food.

4. Gordon Ramsay’s Secrets by Gordon Ramsay

In this incredible and not too badly priced book, Gordon Ramsay lets you in on a few secrets that have made him the world-renowned chef that we have all come to love. With a huge collection of recipes from poultry to fish and desserts to soups, this cookbook lets you in on inside info that will have friends and family thinking you are a bona-fide kitchen guru. The recipes are simple and effective and Ramsay has even added flourishes of his own, such as useful tips on presenting dishes. If you really have a passion for cooking or would love to learn more, this is the book that teaches you not just to cook but how to become a chef. These tips help to make cooking a truly enjoyable experience and will boost your confidence to be adventurous not only in cooking but also in eating as well.

3. The Complete Book of Sushi by Hideo Dekura

As a self-confessed sushi addict this book is incredible – the pages are almost edible. It combines the modern with the traditional and allows you to get to grips with this difficult Japanese style of cooking. Although not to everyone’s taste, this book teaches you the secrets behind making that difficult sticky rice and how to present your sushi in wonderful ways. The most interesting thing about Dekura’s book is they way it advances from simple to expert. This allows you to move gradually at your own pace and also sets little targets within the book. Whilst there are other books on the market such as Yo Sushi’s, it is Dekura’s book that really stands out of the crowd. With gorgeous photography it inspires with a mere flick of the page, and unlike its contemporaries has clear and simple instructions. A must have for any sushi fan and it also makes a great present.

2. Wahaca – Mexican Food At Home by Thomasina Miers

This book comes in at number two of this best cooking books top ten and is a must have for any frequent Wahaca customer. It was only recently published and plunges you straight into the vibrant and tasty world of Mexican street food. One thing that did surprise me was the breakfast section, and I have to admit I have been thoroughly converted to a mexican way of eating in the morning. Full of beautiful pictures and written in an accessible and friendly way, this book does exactly what the title states and brings Mexican food straight into your kitchen. Miers has clearly done the research required for such an exquisite book, and the information about mexican chillies is invaluable. An excellent book for cooking meals for friends and a great equivalent to BBQ parties.

1.Jaime does… by Jaime Oliver

In at number one is Jaime does. In this book Jaime travels through foodie hotspots such as Spain, France and Morocco in order to find innovative recipes. The book is beautifully presented (like all of Jaime’s books) and has wonderful pictures of his travels alongside the amazing pictures of his food. Each country has an introductory paragraph that explains the culture and food he came into contact with, and then in very simple language and an ever friendly tone, Jaime guides you through a range of dishes. From light bites such as patatas bravas to the more complex dishes like the steak tartare, Jaime’s tone never condescends you as the amateur chef. This book not only provides great enjoyment as a teaching tool but is also nice to flip through every now and again to behold the location shots of his food journey. Overall a very deserving winner of this Best Cooking Books list. Absolutely delicious!

This is by no means the only ten cook books I think you should own. There are many other brilliant cookbooks out there for beginners such as The Student Cookbook by Sophie Grigson. This is superb for amateur chefs who simply do not have the time to cook elaborate meals every day and are after recipes for both real cooking and convenience cooking. Then for more adventurous chefs who are willing to getinventive and scientific in the kitchen, there is Heston Bluementhal’s brilliant book The Fat Duck Cookbook, which combines vivid illustrations and wacky recipes for a truly great cooking experience. Overall, the ten books that compose this best cooking books list all offer friendly, easy to follow guidance which enables you to not only enjoy them as books, but also enjoy them as learning tools that will one day make you the king of the kitchen.

E-books have evolved in their short history to a point where most online surfers have heard of them and understand the different formats. The key to e-books is that they are electronic versions of books and do not require printed versions, but can be available in hard copy form if the publisher chooses. Many self-published writers are finding e-books to be a simple way to express their ideas without the costs and barriers involved with traditional publishing. Amazon has been a leader in the industry with its Kindle reader while Apple has challenged the platform with its iPad, which downloads e-books from the iBookstore.

The main reason for making an e-book can be summed up by efficiency. An e-book doesn’t get lost like a physical book and doesn’t have the problems of torn pages or a worn cover. From a cost perspective, there is no longer any reason to spend a fortune on cutting down a forest to create thousands of copies of a book without knowing if it will sell. In the old world, books might be out of stock if they did sell, requiring new pressings, whereas in the new world e-books are never out of stock. The emerging model for printing hard copy versions now is based on orders as they come in, such as at Amazon.

Another efficient quality of e-books is they can be updated more easily. Traditional books were printed in a series of pressings, based on demand. But if demand diminished a book might go out of print and become outdated. The original pressing might also have misinformation or typos. E-books, however, allow the writer to always have an updated version ready for online distribution, as errors can be corrected immediately, instead of waiting for the printing process to take months.

Consumers enjoy the advantages of e-books over traditional books thanks to lower pricing. Since it costs less money to make and market an e-book than a printed book, the price drops for consumers. Number of pages can still affect the price, but e-books make it possible to sell more items of the same thing. For example, instead of buying an entire book, some people might just want to purchase one chapter at a reduced price. Other advantages of e-books are they can be converted to different languages and they can be used with text-to-speech software to create audio books for people with disabilities.

Today’s e-books are designed for smaller screens than in the past. Dedicated e-book readers have become an extra electronic device people purchase specifically just for reading e-books and online newspapers. The Amazon Kindle has been one of the most popular e-book readers, along with the Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo and Sony Readers. Tablet computers such the iPad make useful e-book readers due to their portability and controls that make reading easier. These devices can download and store e-books from online stores such as Amazon, Apple’s iBookstore, Barnes & Noble, Sony Reader Store and the public library-based OverDrive. Mobile devices such as iPhones and Androids can also read e-books.

Although the e-book market does not have industry formatting standards, the most popular format has been the Adobe PDF files. Web developers tried to construct a system known as Open eBook, a zip file based on XHTML and CSS, that breaks e-books down into components. But the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) has moved closer toward the EPUB format as a standard, allowing the file to be converted to other formats. EPUB can embed metadata, resize text and supports Digital Rights Management.

The popularity of e-books has skyrocketed in the second decade of the 21st century. In May 2011 Amazon reported that its sales of e-books had surpassed sales of hard copy books. A Pew Internet Project survey in 2012 showed that 21 percent of American adults had read an e-book within the past year. It was also found that e-book readership favors people under age 50. A large majority of e-book readers read printed books as well. Nearly half of the respondents said they preferred e-books over printed books.

In 2012 Apple launched iBook Author, which is a software program that allows authors to create e-books in the PDF format on an iPad and directly make products available in the iBooks store and for sharing. Amazon has a platform called CreateSpace for authors to create e-books, which must conform to the site’s policies. Lulu also provides the tools for authors to create and market their own self-published e-books.

E-books have proven to be profitable, even for traditional publishers such as Random House. Fifty Shades of Grey by novelist E.L. James was one of the company’s big sellers in 2012. Half of the 30 million copies sold were e-books. The company reported that e-book sales made up 27 percent of the total book sales, which was a 7 percent increase from a year earlier.

Free e-books can be found at Amazon by looking at their Top 100 Free list. Many times a publisher will give away a sample of a book as an e-book that promotes the printed paperback or hard copy for sale. Sometimes e-books are just free to expose a new author. Apple also offers free e-books at the iBooks store. Other websites that offer free e-books are ManyBooks.net, Free-ebooks.net and Open Culture. You can also search for free e-books using the PDFgeni.com search engine.